The World Before the Flood


The Great Deluge


Mighty ambitious title for a companion post to a podcast if I do say so myself! BUT, I think you'll find it entertaining! In this post, my goal is to give a brief but good comparison of the events leading up to the "Great Deluge" of Genesis (including Enoch description), and of the Epic of Gilgamesh.

I did a previous post sort of like this on called "Flood Myths" that is a companion to the Gilgamesh part 2 episode. Worth checking out! On to business.

Genesis/Enoch
In Genesis, man becomes corrupt, the "sons of god" take "wives of the daughters of men", Nephilim are on the earth God sends the flood and wipes out everything but Noah and the life aboard the ark.

In Enoch, we are told that a group of 200 Angels came to earth, and interbred with human women. The offspring of this union was GIANTS. Massive giants and lots of them. These giants consumed everything man could produce and then eventually, man.  The fallen angels also shared secrets with man, from science to sorcery. I mention "violating the prime directive" in the podcast but I'm completely serious. They handed man things man hadn't earned. The good angels saw all of this happening and confronted God, who commands them to round up and imprison the fallen angels AFTER killing their offspring. Which will then be followed by a massive flood to purge the earth of any corruption that remains. Enoch's great grandson Noah, along with his family, is to be warned of this event and spared. Noah builds an Ark and fills it with animals.

Gilgamesh/Utnapishtim
The gods Anu, Enlil, Ninurta, Ennugi, and Ea are tired of all the noise and activity of the humans whose population has exploded. They are unable to rest or focus. They agreed to exterminate humanity. Enlil was to carry out this extermination but Ea (Enki) had made an oath to the humans. Ea warned Utnapishtim of the coming extermination by flood. So Utnapishtim set out to build a giant boat for he and his household and animals.



So now you can hopefully see the differences and similarities in the stories. For a breakdown of the "flood/post flood" events check out the blog post I mentioned earlier.

What stands out to me in Enoch and Gilgamesh stories is the multiple "deities". One thing that separates Christianity/Judaism from ALL other religions is the belief that God is INFINITE. In Sumeria, Greece, Hindu, Egypt etc... we have polytheistic beliefs. Where no god, not even Amun Ra is all powerful. Enoch also goes on to mention different angels with different skills or domains. There is an angel over the wind, and another over the water. As well as some of the fallen angels teaching humans various skills or spells. That is quite intriguing. Because if you take First Enoch seriously, and add a dose of "syncretism" BAM there is a sort of polytheism in line with many of the old world religions except we have separated God from the "gods" who are now just good or bad angels. You'll also notice than in Enoch, the super horny fallen angels make there initial home on top of a mountain....ring a bell?

Is that all BS? maybe. But to me, there is just so much stuff, flood related or not, pointing to some strange times on the ancient earth that I keep a very open ear.  I do tend to think a lot of forgotten history is hiding under the oceans. I mentioned Graham Hancock in the podcast, he has several books that are really quite "journalistic" in their approach to what we do and don't know about the ancient world. His latest one "America Before" is especially good. Now I'm not necessarily saying "Ancient Aliens" (though some might argue 'whats the difference'), but I think it's preposterous to think that we have it (history) all figured out. 

Anything you want to add or discuss? Idea for a show related to this?  Drop a comment below or hit me up on Minds or Facebook!!!

Books of interest for this episode:

Note: I disliked the "Book of Enoch" with Commentary by Joseph Lumpkin. It was informative but hard to followe at times, and he jumps between Enoch and the Bible quite frequently making it hard to follow IMO, and leading you to associate things that might not be associated at all....



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